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2020s

Innovative, new HIV prevention options – the dapivirine vaginal ring and injectable HIV PrEP – are introduced, but rollout is slow and limited to a few countries. COVID-19 exacerbates existing inequalities, leaving marginalised communities without access to lifesaving vaccines. Anti-rights movements threaten to roll back decades of progress on HIV, gender and sexual equality amidst increasing human rights violations.

Decorative
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2020

Pilot sites for Needle and Syringe Programmes (NSPs) are established in three Nigerian states with high injecting prevalence.

This is due to the advocacy of the Drug Harm Reduction Advocacy Network (DHRAN) in Nigeria, which challenged the government’s negative stance on injecting drug-use. Frontline AIDS supported DHRAN through the Partnership to Inspire, Transform and Connect the HIV response (PITCH) programme.

2020-2024

Building on the successful growth of the READY programme, the READY+ programme enters its second phase, expanding to Angola, Malawi and Zambia. The programme has now reached over 36,000 adolescents and young people and continues to innovate and grow.

2020

The COVID-19 pandemic impacts global health systems and the HIV/AIDS response, demonstrating the need for resilient health systems, integrated disease responses and equitable access to new prevention and treatment to withstand the impact of future pandemics.

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The Frontline AIDS partnership provides peer support and secures funding for innovative programmes to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on marginalised communities and to advocate for more effective and just national health responses. Community-based initiatives provide HIV-related care, support rollouts of national vaccination programmes, access to livelihoods support and psychosocial services.

2020

Marginalised communities continue to bear the brunt of the epidemic. In 2022, over half of all new HIV infections around the world are among key populations (men who have sex with men, people who use drugs, sex workers and transgender people) and their sexual partners, apart from in Eastern and Southern Africa.

2020-25

Introduction of a new Frontline AIDS Global Plan of Action, co-developed with our partners, to sharpen focus on overlooked areas, like HIV prevention and human rights, and to foster innovation.

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2021

At the United Nations General Assembly High-Level Meeting on AIDS, Member States renewed commitments to ending AIDS.

“…[Member States] have drafted, negotiated and delivered a bold political declaration that will guide global efforts to end a pandemic that has ravaged communities for 40 years.”

Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director, UNAIDS.

2020-2024

Building on the successful growth of READY, the READY+ programme enters its second phase, expanding to Angola, Malawi and Zambia.

2021-22

The World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends that the dapivirine vaginal ring, which releases the antiretroviral drug dapivirine from the ring into the vagina slowly over 28 days, may be offered to women at substantial risk of HIV. The WHO also recommends that long-acting injectable cabotegravir (CAB-LA) is offered as an additional prevention choice for people at substantial risk of HIV.

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2022

Marginalised communities continue to bear the brunt of the epidemic. In 2022, over half of all new HIV infections around the world are among key populationsKey populations include: men who have sex with men (MSM), sex workers, transgender people and people who use drugs. In some settings this also includes migrants and people who are in prison. and their sexual partners, apart from in Eastern and Southern Africa.

2022

A new collaborative, open and localised partnershipThe partnership council, an elected group of partners, including Frontline AIDS, promotes and practices a distributed leadership approach to shift and challenge paternalistic practices in the partnership. Our respective organisations oversee the implementation of the Global Plan of Action. model, which emphasises distributed leadership, is introduced. The Frontline AIDS partnership model evolves to share power and accountability with partners leading on our key actions.

Initiatives like the Harm Reduction Academy, led by Alliance for Public Health, Ukraine, enable the sharing of technical expertise widely across the partnership, ensuring organisational sustainability.

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“With each nurtured innovation, systematic change and advocacy victory, we contribute to more saved lives and infections averted. This is what really matters, and what our distributed leadership model helps us to deliver.”

Andriy Klepikov, Executive Director, Alliance for Public Health, Ukraine

2023

Frontline AIDS’ community-led harm reduction programme explores innovative approaches to reduce new hepatitis C and HIV infections amongst people who use drugs in Egypt, Kyrgyzstan and Nigeria. The programme, funded by Unitaid, researches the effectiveness and community acceptability of cutting-edge technologies, such as Low Dead Space SyringesLow dead space syringes reduce the risk of spreading infections, such as HIV and hepatitis C, if they’re re-used or shared. and Needles and long-acting buprenorphine, a form of opioid substitution therapy. A new community-led advisory board will review research methods and ensure the health and rights of people who use drugs are central to the programme.

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2023

Our United for Prevention programme launches, establishing HIV prevention coalitions in seven countries. The programmes support communities to hold countries accountable for delivering the global HIV Prevention 2025 Road Map. The programme builds on nearly eight years of work with partners to improve governments’ accountability to communities and to strengthen community-led advocacy to improve national prevention responses.

2023

2023

BONELA, supported by Frontline AIDS, convenes a Botswana Joint Country Dialogue to prepare for three significant UN High-Level Meetings scheduled for September 2023 on Universal Health coverage, TB and the Pandemic Summit. The event brings together 50 representatives from civil society groups, government, technical partners, and country embassies.

BONELA emerges as a significant player in national and global decision-making processes related to PPPR Pandemic Preparedness, Prevention and Response and their influence extends to the international stage, with its executive director, Cindy Kelemi, selected as a panellist for a high-level meeting on PPPR at the UN General Assembly in May 2023.

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BONELA emerges as a significant player in national and global decision-making processes related to PPPR and their influence extends to the international stage, with its executive director, Cindy Kelemi, selected as a panellist for a high-level meeting on PPPR at the UN General Assembly in May 2023.

2023

The Frontline AIDS partnership has grown to 60 partners, the world’s largest collective of civil society organisations working to end AIDS.

The Frontline AIDS partnership collectively reaches

7.8 million

people in 2023, reaching 5 million more people since 2018.

The Frontline AIDS partnership also provides

1,236

organisations with technical or financial support.

2024

With only six years to meet the SDG target to end AIDS by 2030, we are working on urgent priorities: continuing to invest in HIV prevention, fighting for human rights, gender equality and access to health and justice, and creating health systems that put people at the centre.

We are learning from our history to innovate with our partners to create a future free from AIDS for everyone, everywhere.

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